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2006-10-03

  • Proceedings Haskell Workshop 1995. Henrik Nilsson announced that in celebration of the 10th Haskell Workshop that took place recently, the proceedings of the very first Haskell workshop, in La Jolla 1995, have now been made available on the Haskell Workshop home page. Thanks to Paul Hudak for help locating the proceedings and arranging for them to be scanned into PDF.

  • Common library for generic programming. Johan Jeuring and Andres Loeh announced an initiative to design a common library for generic programming, which should work together with most of the Haskell compilers, and for which they hope to guarantee support for generics in Haskell into the future. If you want to get involved (or just want to see the discussion), you can subscribe to the generics mailing list. Check the Haskell research wiki for some background on generics.

  • GHC 6.6 Second Release Candidate. Ian Lynagh announced that the Second Release Candidate phase for GHC 6.6 is underway. Get testing!

  • Lazy functional language for the JVM. Luke Evans announced that the research group at Business Objects has developed a lazily evaluated, strongly-typed language called CAL, with many similarities to Haskell, targeting the JVM, to facilitate representing certain kinds of business logic as reusable, composable pieces.

2006-09-27

  • ICFP Contest Results. CMU's Principles of Programming Group announced the results of this year's ICFP programming contest. Congratulations to the winning team from Google, 'Team Smartass', (Christopher Hendrie, Derek Kisman, Ambrose Feinstein and Daniel Wright), who used Haskell along with C++, Bash and Python. Haskell has now been used by the winning team three years running! An honourable mention to team Lazy Bottoms, another Haskell team, who managed to crack several of the puzzles first. Five teams from the #haskell IRC channel were placed in the top 50. A video stream of the results announcement is available, shot and cut by Malcolm Wallace. Many thanks to the CMU team for organising such a great contest!

  • New release of Hugs. Ross Paterson announced a new minor release of Hugs, fixing a few bugs with the May 2006 release, and with libraries roughly matching the forthcoming GHC 6.6 release. It is available from the Hugs page.

  • HAppS version 0.8.2. Einar Karttunen announced the release of the Haskell Application Server version 0.8.2. HAppS is a Haskell web application server for building industrial strength internet applications safely, quickly, and easily. With HAppS you focus entirely on application functionality implemented in your favourite language and you don't have to worry about making sure all sorts of server subsystems are functioning properly. More info.

  • Codec.Compression.GZip and .BZip. Duncan Coutts released two new packages: zlib and bzlib, which provide functions for compression and decompression in the gzip and bzip2 formats, directly on ByteStrings. Both provide pure functions on streams of data represented by lazy ByteStrings. This makes it easy to use either in memory or with disk or network IO. There is API documentation is available here and here.

  • System Fc branch merged into GHC. Manuel Chakravarty merged the System Fc branch of GHC into GHC head. This is a significant development, adding extensions to GHC to support an FC-based intermediate language, a new implementation of GADTs, along with indexed data types and indexed newtypes (generalised associated data types). More details about the implementation.

  • Job writing security software in Haskell. Andrew Pimlott announced that Planning Systems, Inc. has a job opportunity for Haskell programmers, writing a high-assurance authorization system. Job description.

  • Dr Haskell 0.1. Neil Mitchell released Dr Haskell, a tool to help suggest improvements to your Haskell code. Dr Haskell will analyse your code, and suggest shorter alternatives for rewriting. More details.

  • BitSyntax for Haskell. Adam Langley released a bit syntax library for Haskell, based on Erlang's bit syntax (great for building and breaking up binary structures). Nice!

  • More news